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“What if, sometimes, there be mists and fogs so thick that I cannot see the path? It is enough that You hold my hand, and guide me in the darkness; for walking with You in the gloom is far sweeter and safer than walking alone in the sunlight!” -Susannah Spurgeon
Part of fulfilling my job as a nanny includes filling these little hearts and minds with books, songs, stories, and words that drive their thoughts, hearts, and affections to the only righteous One. Here are some of my recommendations for doing so. (Link in bio.)
Lilli was praying while coloring earlier and said, “God, I love You when You’re the same and I still love You when You’re not the same.” • This echoes a lot of conversations we have on a daily basis, conversations of how she is loved regardless of her actions and how we “love you when you listen and we love you don’t.” • “Hey, Lilli, want to hear some amazing news?” • She always does. • “God never changes,” I tell her. “He’s always the same.” • “Wow.” • “How does that make you feel?” • She smiled so big. “It makes me feel really happy.” • “Why would that make you happy?” • “Because I love Him and I want Him to come everywhere with me and if He never changes it means He is always with me.” • She’s three years old. • Solid theology is a comfort for every age. Praise God for His immutability.
“Are you not willing to pass through every ordeal if by any means you may save some?” -Charles Spurgeon

Follow me as I follow Jesus

Singing in the Fire

singing in the fire.jpg

As previously mentioned, Susannah Spurgeon is my new bff. 

Here’s a snippet from her biography Free Grace and Dying Love (which I cannot recommend more highly). It’s long but one of the most encouraging things I’ve ever read. Wherever you are and whatever season you’re in, I hope it ministers to you too.

At the close of a very dark and gloomy day I lay resting on my couch as the deeper night drew on, and though all was bright within my cosy little room, some of the external darkness seemed to have entered into my soul and obscured its spiritual vision. Vainly I tried to see the hand which I knew held mine and guided my fog-enveloped feet along a steep and slippery path of suffering. In sorrow of heart I asked, ‘Why does my Lord thus deal with His child? Why does He so often send sharp and bitter pain to visit me? Why does He permit lingering weakness to hinder the sweet service I long to render to His poor servants?’ These fretful questions were quickly answered, and though in a strange language, no interpreter was needed for the conscious whisper of my own heart.

For a while silence reigned in the little room, broken only by the crackling of an oak log burning on the hearth. Suddenly I heard a sweet, soft sound, a little, clear, musical note, like the tender trill of a robin beneath my window. ‘What can it be?’ I said to my companion, who was dozing in the firelight; ‘surely no bird can be singing out there at this time of the year and night!’ We listened, and again heard the faint plaintive notes, so sweet, so melodious, yet mysterious enough to provoke for a moment our undisguised wonder. Presently my friend exclaimed, ‘It comes from the log on the fire!!’ and we soon ascertained that her surprised assertion was correct. The fire was letting loose the imprisoned music from the old oak’s inmost heart. Perchance he had garnered up this song in the days when all went well with him, when birds twittered merrily on his branches, and the soft sunlight flecked his tender leaves with gold; but he had grown old since then and hardened; ring after ring of knotty growth had sealed up the long-forgotten melody until the fierce tongues of the flames came to consume his callousness and the vehement heat of the fire wrung from him at once a song and a sacrifice.

Oh! thought I, when the fire of affliction draws songs of praise from us, then indeed are we purified and our God is glorified! Perhaps some of us are like this old oak log–cold, hard and insensible; we should give forth no melodious sounds were it not for the fire which kindles round us, and releases tender notes of trust in Him, and cheerful compliance with His will. As I mused the fire burned and my soul found sweet comfort in the parable so strangely set before me. Singing in the fire! Yes, God helping us if that is the only way to get harmony out of these hard, apathetic hearts, let the furnace be heated seven times hotter than before.

-Susannah Spurgeon

One comment on “Singing in the Fire

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